The Argory is a stately home that is maintained and run by the National Trust Northern Ireland. It is located on the outskirts of Armagh in County Armagh. It is a fine example of neoclassical architecture. It dates from around 1820. However, additional work has been done over the years. The current look dates from about 1900 with the interior reflecting the tastes of the time.

The highlight exhibit is a cabinet barrel organ dating from 1824 and still in good working order. In the stable room you can see a harness room as well as old horse carriages. The home is surrounded by 320 acres of woodland, garden and walking trails. If the weather is nice you can explore the grounds. Even if the weather is misty make sure you have an umbrella to keep you dry and the walking experience will be equally enjoyable.

There are ample parking facilities, a children’s play area, a gift and second hand book store and the award winning Lady Ada’s tea room with home baked delights as its specialty.

As with other National Trust UK properties, it is in excellent state of preservation and well looked after. It offers a serene and idyllic environment for a walk or a picnic. There is an entry fee both to the grounds and to the home.

Contact Information

144 Derrycaw Road, Moy, Dungannon, Co. Armagh BT71 6NA

Telephone: 028 8778 4753

For the official website and pricing information click here.

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